Group reviews inconsistent dorm policies

first_imgMembers of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”last_img read more

Huang chosen as dean

first_imgRoger Huang shed the title of interim and now serves as the Martin J. Gillen Dean of the Mendoza College of Business, according to a University press release Friday. “I am honored and humbled by this opportunity to assume the deanship of the Mendoza College of Business,” Huang said in the release. “I am inspired by the vision of the founder of the business school, Cardinal John O’Hara, who said that the primary function of commerce is service to mankind. “This vision sets the Mendoza College apart form other business schools, and I look forward to furthering our vision of business as a powerful force for good.” Huang earned the appointment as interim dean of the College when former dean Carolyn Woo left last year to serve as president of Catholic Relief Services. As interim dean, Huang finalized a partnership between Notre Dame and Renmin University in Beijing to offer a graduate business program for Chinese students pursuing careers with nonprofit organizations. He has been a member of the Notre Dame faculty since 2000 and currently serves as the Kenneth R. Meyer Professor of Global Investment Management. “Roger is an internationally respected scholar who during his time at Notre Dame has proved to be an equally accomplished leader,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said in the press release. “His reputation in his field, administrative experience, strategic perspective and commitment to Notre Dame’s mission as a Catholic research university are extraordinary. “I look forward to working closely with him as we continue to build a superb business school that serves the greater good.”last_img read more

Sophia Program adds a class

first_imgThe Class of 2017 is the second class at Saint Mary’s to be a part of the Sophia Program, a general education curriculum, but the first to take a part in the First Year Common Course, a weekly one-credit seminar for first-year students. Sophia Curriculum Committee Chair Julie Storme said first-year students are enrolled in the common course this semester in order to focus on advising, to gain a better understanding of what the program entails and to provide the incoming Belles with a common experience. The Sophia Program began last year with the Class of 2016, and all aspects of the program will be implemented in time for the Class of 2019, student chair of the Sophia Curriculum Committee Shannon Schalk said. “This year’s Class of 2017 is phase two and that’s pretty much just to make sure that if there is a problem within Sophia that they didn’t catch, before they implement the entire thing, they can catch it,” Schalk said. The transition into the Sophia Program has been difficult, especially for the current sophomores, but the changes that have been made and the continual effort to make the program an integral part of Saint Mary’s education made it easier for the first-years, Schalk said. “They (The Sophia Curriculum Committee) have time and the ability to adjust when they need to so that it’s even better for the next class,” she said. The Sophia Program is the only of its kind in the country, Schalk said, and it caters to all the different majors on campus in order to help the women of the College be citizens of the world. “Saint Mary’s gets you ahead by making sure you can actually be a part of the world around you when you leave rather than just your field,” Schalk said. Schalk, a sophomore, said she originally wanted to attend Michigan State in order to pursue the school’s pre-med program, but one of the aspects of Saint Mary’s which made her change her mind was the Sophia Program. “Technically, Michigan State does have a better major, but at the end of the day, for the person that I want to be, and the person that I want to become, is more than just a doctor, and I realized that Saint Mary’s could give me that,” she said. Storme, the first-year advisor and the teacher of the common course, said the class is about building relationships. “How can we facilitate a real relationship? Well, have them in a class,” she said. “That is where faculty and students really form relationships, typically.” The course also draws from the human level of shared experiences, which form a common bond, Storme said. One of the common experiences for the new students is they are all reading a book titled “What the Best College Students Do” by Ken Bane. “That’s what we want Sophia to be, too. It’s built around learning outcomes … and what you should be able to do as a student at the end of the course as a learner,” Storme said. Student reactions to the class, which first-years have attended once a week since starting classes, are mixed. First-year student Jessica Jones said she could be using that hour for studying. “It gets you comfortable with professors,” Jones said, “but sometimes it just puts on extra work.” However, first-year Madeline Lay said she viewed the class as an advantage. “It’s a very intelligent choice,” Lay said. “It ensures that we have a fully integrated education rather than just a specialized one.”last_img read more

PrismND establishes bylaws, unites allies

first_imgAlthough student body president Alex Coccia does not identify LGBTQ concerns as a priority of his administration, he said student government supported the implementation of the University’s “Beloved Friends and Allies” pastoral plan.  Specifically, Coccia said he and student body vice president Nancy Joyce sat on the selection panel for the assistant director who would address LGBTQ student concerns. He said he also named a student representative to the advisory committee on LGBTQ issues to Vice President for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding. “One of our recommendations in the [Oct. 17] Board of Trustees report was that the [advisory] council meet regularly … that it gets off to a good start,” Coccia said. “The purpose is essentially to gauge campus climate on LGBTQ inclusion and help make recommendations to [Hoffmann Harding] as we move forward on this issue.” In the report to the Student Affairs Committee of the Board of Trustees, Coccia’s administration recommended the advisory committee meet for the first time no later than Thanksgiving break and gather four times in the spring 2014 semester. The administration also suggested the Office of Student Affairs “engage in action-oriented conversation regarding transgender students in the University housing system.”  In his May 1 State of the Student Union address, Coccia said his administration backed the LGBTQ student organization PrismND, and reiterated his administration’s support in an interview with The Observer. “We plan to fully support the implementation of the new LGBTQ and ally student organization as it is incorporated into the student unions… and we look forward to the honor of co-sponsoring one of their initial events,” Coccia said in the address. This group now can assume the role played by the former LGBTQ student group, which operated without official University approval. “Students had a huge victory a year ago, which was the recognition of the LGBTQ student group,” Coccia said. “Many of the efforts that I think were necessary [before] … can now be facilitated by PrismND.” The founding members of PrismND began to develop the group’s bylaws last semester, Coccia said.  “Then we started to formalize them a bit more, make the language consonant with what organization languages are and what organization bylaws look like, which includes components of funding and membership and meeting logistics,” he said. “Then it was back-and-forth conversation … to ensure that the bylaws were solid and reflective of what the purpose of the organization was.” Sophomore Connor Hayes, co-president of PrismND, said the club finalized its bylaws in early October, with the exception of one part that was solidified earlier this week.  Co-president Bryan Ricketts said PrismND’s first major event was a celebration of National Coming Out Day on Oct. 11. The group set up “closet” structures outside DeBartolo Hall and the LaFortune Student Center and encouraged students to “come out” as anything – a member of the LGBTQ community, a fan of country music, a peace studies major or something else.  Ricketts, a sophomore, said PrismND also sponsored a National Coming Out Day lunch with Pasquerilla East Hall. He said two speakers at the lunch discussed the concept of coming out both from an academic perspective and on a personal level.  PrismND’s other main event this semester was StaND Against Hate Week from Nov. 4 through 8, Hayes said. The week, which the Gender Relations Center and Multicultural Student Programs and Services co-sponsored, featured a “What It Means to be an Ally” dinner, two lectures and a candlelight prayer service.  Hayes said,between 20 and 30 people attend the group’s organizational meetings, every other week. He said next semester PrismND will hold separate meetings in which people can discuss issues they face. The organizational meetings do not serve this function because they are mainly meant as time for planning events, Ricketts said. “They’re not necessarily a space where community can grow,” he said. “We want to have a space where people can just come and talk about issues on campus, issues they’re having, issues they see in the world outside of the Notre Dame bubble.”  PrismND aims to be a welcoming space for all parts of the LGBTQ and ally communities on campus, Hayes said.  “We want to make sure that [the group] doesn’t develop some sort of reputation of being associated with certain things, associated with certain parts of the University. Someone could be like, ‘Oh, that’s a liberal part of the University, and I identify as gay, but I’m kind of conservative, and I don’t think I feel at home there.’  “That kind of thing – making sure that it is as inclusive as possible. … I think that’s kind of a guiding principle to a lot of things that we do.” Hayes said now that PrismND’s working dynamics are established, the group aims to host more programming next semester.  LGBTQ concerns remain a “very personal priority” for Coccia, he said.  “We’ve really come to a new step in campus culture,” Coccia said. “The way I like to frame it … is two-and-a-half years ago, the question was, ‘Are you an ally?’ … The question now is, ‘Why wouldn’t you be an ally?’ “Student government’s role in this respect, I think, is continually providing a support for that.” Contact Marisa Iati at miati@nd.edulast_img read more

Academic fraternities foster scholastic excellence

first_imgContrary to popular belief, Greek life does exist on Notre Dame’s campus. Although the University does not sanction any social fraternities or sororities, a number of academic fraternities provide students with unique scholastic and professional opportunities and networks. According to the Student Activities Office (SAO) website, nine undergraduate student clubs, in fields ranging from accounting to political science and engineering, are part of national academic organizations that use Greek letters as identifiers. Senior Dominic Romeo, the co-president of Notre Dame’s chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, a political science honor society, said the organization provides its members with excellent scholarship opportunities as well as a valuable network. “There are some scholarships through the national organization that students can apply for,” Romeo said. “They can also get grant funding through the national organization, too. Pi Sigma Alpha also puts you into a global network of people who have excelled in political science.”Ashlee Hunt, a first year student in Notre Dame’s Master of Science in Accountancy (MSA) program serves as president of Notre Dame’s chapter of Beta Alpha Psi, an accounting honor society. She said Beta Alpha Psi hosts a variety of events for its members to network and perform service. “We have professional events when someone from a company like Deloitte comes in and gives a presentation,” Hunt said. “We also have service events where students will go out and volunteer at places like the Robinson Community Learning Center.“We also do interactive service activities with companies. KPMG is coming on Feb. 26 and we are making shoebox school supply kits for elementary school students.”As honor societies, these organizations often require members to maintain outstanding grades and display strong leadership characteristics. Hunt said along with a rigorous GPA requirement, Beta Alpha Psi requires students to perform service and attend events sponsored by the organization. “Members are inducted during their junior year and then they are required to complete six service hours and six professional hours per semester to remain members,” she said. Senior Jane McGuinness, president of Notre Dame’s chapter of Tau Beta Pi, an engineering honor society, said her organization chooses members based on “character, service, leadership and scholarship.”“Tau Beta Pi has a selective process of initiating people,” McGuinness, an electrical engineering major, said. “They invite the top eighth of the junior engineering class and top fifth of the senior engineering class to apply.”McGuinness said Tau Beta Pi also runs tutoring sessions as part of its academic and service mission on Notre Dame’s campus. “The main way we give back to the school is our tutoring programs,” McGuinness said. “We have nightly sessions for upper level engineering classes in all of the different engineering fields.”Senior Taryn Green, a member of Upsilon Pi Epsilon (UPE), a computer science honor society, said students could also receive significant scholarships for their work. “Because we are an honor society, we mostly just exist on this campus to recognize student’s academic achievement and provide them an additional scholarship route through the national Upsilon Pi Epsilon organization,” Green said. “Members can apply for a scholarship through the executive UPE council. Scholarships range between $750 to $1500.” Romeo said members of Pi Sigma Alpha are eligible for scholarships and grants and gain access to an expansive professional and academic network. “There are some scholarships through the national organization that students can apply for,” Romeo said. “They can also get grant funding through the national organization, too. It also puts you into a global network of people who have excelled in political science.”Notre Dame also has chapters of Pi Tau Sigma (engineering), Psi Chi (psychology), Chi Epsilon (civil engineering), Eta Kappa Nu (computer and electrical engineering) and Lambda Alpha (anthropology). Tags: Greek lifelast_img read more

ND club of Tallahassee prepares for game weekend

first_imgSam Coughlin With the promise of fall break, College GameDay and a much-hyped football game to look forward to, it is safe to say many Notre Dame students are excited about the upcoming weekend.The Notre Dame Club of Tallahassee, in collaboration with other organizations, is busy working to make the weekend a success for visiting students, alumni and fans alike.“Downtown Tallahassee is a great area, and we’re excited to share it with the ND crowd,” Joe Hurd, a member of the class of 1982 and chairperson for the Notre Dame Club of Tallahassee, said. “We’re collaborating with the Notre Dame clubs in Miami and Jacksonville, as well as the local St. Thomas More Catholic Church to make the weekend a great experience for everyone.”The club will begin its celebration Friday evening with a social gathering and pep rally near Tallahassee’s Adams Street Commons. Early online registration is encouraged to secure tickets.The Commons also will be the site of Tallahassee’s Downtown Get Down, featuring a performance from a local band, food vendors and a block party atmosphere, according to the event website.“There will be students and visitors not just from all over Florida, but from all over the country,” Hurd said. “There will be plenty of opportunities for networking and fun.”The College GameDay broadcast will begin Saturday at 9 a.m. on the Langford Green, located just outside Doak Campbell Stadium.“The rivalry will be fierce, and I am excited to be there to help cheer the Irish on to victory,” sophomore Maura Boston, who will be traveling to the game with the Notre Dame marching band, said.On game day, the Notre Dame Clubs of Tallahassee and Miami will sponsor an all-day tailgating event at the Tallahassee Civic Center. The event will include a cash bar, games, raffles, a putting green event and more. At 4 p.m., a pre-game mass will be held at the local St. Thomas More Catholic Church. The bishop of Pensacola-Tallahassee will preside.“It was very important for us to include a liturgical aspect in the day,” Hurd said. “And the mass counts for your Sunday obligation.”Hurd said there will be many viewing options available for those who do not have tickets.“Nearly every tavern and restaurant around will have the game on, and we’re hosting an official watch party in the bar at the local Four Points Hotel,” he said.Some students attending the game are planning to extend the trip into fall break, renting houses and staying in Florida for the week.“On Sunday after the game, my friends and I are driving to a little quaint beachside town a few hours away,” senior Alison Leddy said. “We’ll be there for the rest of the break, relaxing and eating and soaking up the sun before the South Bend winter hits.”Hurd recommended a number of visitor’s sites including the Tallahassee capitol buildings, the beaches at St. George Island located two hours to the south and Tallahassee’s Midtown and College Town areas.Tags: college gameday, fall break, florida state, florida state game, notre dame alumni club, tallahassee, tallahassee notre dame clublast_img read more

Corporate executive emphasizes ethics in business

first_imgTom Tropp, vice president of corporate ethics and sustainability for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., visited Notre Dame on Tuesday to discuss corporate ethics. The lecture was part of the Berges Lecture Series in Business Ethics, held each fall by Notre Dame’s Center for Ethics and Religious Values in Business and the Institute for Ethical Business Worldwide. In this series, senior executives speak about their personal experiences involving ethics from a corporate point of view.In 2007, Tropp earned a Masters in philosophical and theological ethics at the University of Chicago Divinity School. That same year, his international insurance brokerage company was bought out by Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., landing Tropp the opportunity to start his career rooted in ethics at Gallagher.“I went back to school to study theology,” Tropp said. “I went to learn more about my faith and within a semester, I fell in love with ethics. It was a personal conviction. Crazy, I was 55 years old when I went back to school.”Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. is the third largest insurance brokerage firm in the world and participates in 30 to 35 mergers every year. Tropp said Gallagher focuses not only on the stockbroker, but also on the stakeholder and the ethics involved in the process.“About 15 years ago … people began in the business world to equate compliance and ethics,” Tropp said. “If it’s legal, it’s ethical.“That’s not true,” he said. “There is a difference between compliance and ethics, and it is important that we understand that in the corporate world.”Tropp also addressed the misconception that ethics and compliance are synonymous. He said the two are in fact very different because compliance tells people what they must do, whereas ethics states what people should do.“Compliance is about the minimum. … Ethics is the stuff that raises us above the minimum and makes us think different from other companies,” Tropp said. “… Every company you deal with has the same compliance. Ethics is unique. Ethics is different at every company because ethics follows the people.”Tropp said that a “high integrity” company is composed of four points: corporate ethics, environmental integrity, community involvement and employee health and welfare. He said that Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. has a document called “The Gallagher Way” that helps uphold these four elements.“The Gallagher Way was made in May of 1984,” Tropp said. “… We will not change it. It is the most important document in our company. Every major decision we make on the 25th floor, that document is lying on the table.”Tropp said he believes there are certain values every human being deserves. He said these values are non-exclusionary but universal.“Different cultures have different standards of compliance, but values transcend borders,” Tropp said.Tropp ended his lecture with some advice for students about to enter the job market.“Avoid paranoia. Avoid fear. Pick a company that you respect,” Tropp said. “Lots of people take a job because they think they’re not going to have another opportunity. Don’t do it. Get a job with a company you respect.”Tags: ethics, Mendoza, mendoza college of businesslast_img read more

Justice Friday lecture explores implications of Title IX for LGBTQ students

first_imgThis week’s installment of the College’s Justice Fridays lecture series focused on explaining how Title IX protects students of all gender identities and sexual orientation from sex-based discrimination.Saint Mary’s senior Bri O’Brien led the conversation, focusing on how Title IX can benefit the LGBTQ community on college campuses. She offered a concise explanation of how Title IX works.“Title IX extends to claims of discrimination based on gender identity or failure to conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity or femininity,” O’Brien said.“Men, women, transgender students anybody of any gender identity or sexual orientation cannot be discriminated on that basis because that all originates from sex.”“You cannot discriminate on the basis of sex in any educational institutions that receive public funds … from that they [Title IX] elaborate onto sex-based harassment, gender based harassment, sexual violence and sexual harassment,” O’Brien said.While Saint Mary’s does an excellent job informing students of their rights when sexual assault occurs, O’Brien said, there is less focus on how Title IX protects the LGBTQ community.“We [Saint Mary’s] don’t really touch on the LGBTQ part of it,” O’Brien said.She said administrators should be trained and treat same-sex sexual harassment the same as heterosexual sexual harassment.“Recently, the [Office of Civil Rights’s] elaborated guidance on Title IX specifically said that administrators, faculty, staff, Title IX coordinators, deputy coordinators, mandated reporters; all these people have to have specified training on how to work with LGBTQ students.“When it comes to same sex assault, Title IX mandates the process should be the same for same sex assaults as it is for non-same sex assaults. So that means it shouldn’t look any different, you shouldn’t be asked any different questions,” O’Brien said.Junior Sarah Bastian said she had a better understanding of Title IX after the talk.“I learned that Title IX applies to every single student, regardless of sexual identity, who is a victim of sexual assault or harassment,” she said. “Also, there are women here at Saint Mary’s who sexually harass fellow students, but that is not discussed. The discussions mostly revolve around women being victimized by men. Neither situation should be ignored.”O’Brien concluded the talk by advising students to know their rights and to let the administration know they know their rights under Title IX to avoid miscommunication.Bastian said a basic knowledge of Title IX would enable students to more effectively navigate the system should they become a victim of sexual discrimination or harassment.“If you don’t know your rights, you cannot fully stand up for yourself,” she said.The Justice Friday lecture series takes place every Friday from 12 p.m. to 12:50 p.m. in Conference Room A and B of the Student Center.Tags: Justice Fridays, Title IXlast_img read more

Five players charged with misdemeanors

first_imgThe five Notre Dame football players arrested in Fulton County, Indiana, on Aug. 19 all face Class B misdemeanor charges for possession of marijuana, according to a report from ND Insider. The five students — senior Max Redfield, sophomores Dexter Williams, Te’von Coney and Ashton White and freshman Kevin Stepherson — were arrested at approximately 10:07 p.m. Aug. 19 during a traffic stop. Redfield will also face charges for carrying a handgun without a license, a Class A misdemeanor, according to the report. The handgun charges were dropped against Stepherson and Williams, who were both in the backseat of the car and had access to the handgun. The initial hearing for all five students is set for Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., according to the report.The 2007 Ford Focus, driven by White, was pulled over for a speeding violation and an improper taillight when State Trooper Ben Reason allegedly detected the odor of marijuana coming from the car, an Indiana State Police press release said. From there, a narcotics dog indicated the presence of illegal narcotics inside the vehicle, and in the subsequent search, officers allegedly found marijuana and a loaded handgun. Redfield was dismissed from the football team following the incident while the other four students were disciplined internally by the program. Irish head coach Brian Kelly has said that all four will be available to play against Texas on Sunday, unless otherwise disciplined by the University’s Office of Community Standards.Tags: Ashton White, Brian Kelly, Dexter Williams, football, Fulton County, Kevin Stepherson, Max Redfield, Notre Dame football, Tevon Coneylast_img read more

Howard Hall rector, residents reflect on community, diversity

first_imgThe smallest women’s dorm, boasting 148 residents and 45 single rooms, is nothing if not mighty.Howard Hall, home of the ducks, stands out because of its Gothic architecture and incredibly tight community, sophomore and hall president Gracie O’Connell said.“It’s so small, you get to know so many people in it,” O’Connell said. “It’s old, so, you know, we’ve got some character.”Howard Hall, usually the second-smallest women’s dorm, beat out Badin Hall this year because of the additional residents Badin could accommodate in Pangborn.Howard Hall was built in 1924 as the cornerstone of South Quad. It became a women’s dorm in the 1987 and now hosts annual events such as Totter for Water, Howard Halliday and the Lenten Chapel Crawl, among others.“We had an event called ‘Combat National Lame Duck Day,’” O’Connell said. “We gave out 500 pieces of cake outside of DeBart one day.”Howard’s rector, Amanda Springstead, graduated from Notre Dame in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in theology and philosophy, and she lived in Welsh Family Hall as an undergrad.“It was my time living on campus here at Notre Dame that was really what made me want to go into higher education,” Springstead said. “I wouldn’t trade my experience in Welsh Fam for anything, but as a fit for me as a rector, Howard’s definitely a perfect place for me to be.”The biggest difference between Welsh Family and Howard is the size, Springstead said. The smallness of Howard facilitates community participation in the dorm.“Hall council every Tuesday is kind of attended by everyone,” Springstead said. “You just come down, pile into the Pond, which is our lounge. … We have a snack and we chat and people tend to linger afterward.”Springstead’s family lives in South Bend, so their standard poodle, Lola, gets to spend time in the dorm and join the women for a monthly event, Cookies with Lola, in Springstead’s apartment.Springstead started as a rector in 2014, the same year as the current senior class entered Notre Dame as freshmen.Senior and RA Maggie Gentine remembers being incredibly nervous on move-in weekend her freshman year, but those nerves were quelled once she met the Howard Hall student leadership, she said.“It was really welcoming, and everyone was smiling and just wanted to invite you into their home,” Gentine said.Since Welcome Weekend, Gentine said she has appreciated living in Howard.“It’s pretty much like my family or my second home,” she said. “It’s a tight community, and everyone gets to know each other pretty well.”In order to foster that family feel, O’Connell said she plans to revamp a program within Howard this year to honor the diversity of the dorm. The program, called the Howard Community Series, allows residents of the dorm to give a lecture about their own identity or experience.“I think it would be really cool to bring that back so girls could talk about different issues,” O’Connell said. “I think it’s important to talk about issues that aren’t usually brought up in classes.”In the past, speakers have spoken about their role as allies of the LGBTQ and minority communities, O’Connell said.“To be able to make it a safe environment, where everybody is comfortable to talk, I think that would be really key,” she said.In Howard, making sure everyone feels comfortable is very important to the entire community, Springstead said. Due of the high number of singles, residents from other dorms who opt to float for a single often end up in Howard, keeping the population somewhat in flux year to year.As another one of the community features of Howard, the RAs plan consistent programming, particularly on Friday and Saturday nights.“That way, people also have the option to do something else fun,” Gentine said. “There’s always something for people to be doing in case they don’t know exactly what to do on the weekends.”O’Connell said the women of Howard stand out because, although they are few, they are very vocal and passionate members of the campus community.“It’s such a privilege to serve the women in Howard Hall,” O’Connell said. “It’s so awesome that they chose me to be their leader. … I want to do my best to make them happy and make this upcoming year the best for them.”Springstead said she also feels lucky to have returned to her alma mater and serve as a pastoral leader for the women.“I think we have a really wonderful group of women here, and I’m just really proud to be able to be their rector,” Springstead said. “They teach me things every day.”Tags: combat national lame duck day, dorm features, Howard Halllast_img read more