Group reviews inconsistent dorm policies

first_imgMembers of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”last_img read more

Five players charged with misdemeanors

first_imgThe five Notre Dame football players arrested in Fulton County, Indiana, on Aug. 19 all face Class B misdemeanor charges for possession of marijuana, according to a report from ND Insider. The five students — senior Max Redfield, sophomores Dexter Williams, Te’von Coney and Ashton White and freshman Kevin Stepherson — were arrested at approximately 10:07 p.m. Aug. 19 during a traffic stop. Redfield will also face charges for carrying a handgun without a license, a Class A misdemeanor, according to the report. The handgun charges were dropped against Stepherson and Williams, who were both in the backseat of the car and had access to the handgun. The initial hearing for all five students is set for Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., according to the report.The 2007 Ford Focus, driven by White, was pulled over for a speeding violation and an improper taillight when State Trooper Ben Reason allegedly detected the odor of marijuana coming from the car, an Indiana State Police press release said. From there, a narcotics dog indicated the presence of illegal narcotics inside the vehicle, and in the subsequent search, officers allegedly found marijuana and a loaded handgun. Redfield was dismissed from the football team following the incident while the other four students were disciplined internally by the program. Irish head coach Brian Kelly has said that all four will be available to play against Texas on Sunday, unless otherwise disciplined by the University’s Office of Community Standards.Tags: Ashton White, Brian Kelly, Dexter Williams, football, Fulton County, Kevin Stepherson, Max Redfield, Notre Dame football, Tevon Coneylast_img read more

‘Sex Signals’ seeks to demonstrate culture of consent

first_imgPoncho Ortega | The Observer Jessamyn Fitzpatrick, left, and Vincent Banks of Catharsis Production perform during ‘Sex Signals’ Monday night. The Gender Relations Center program aims to create a culture of consent.“This year we revised the design of the first two weeks to be more conversation based and included the opportunity for Sex Signals, which uses humor, case studies and audience participation,” Gebhardt said. “It is our hope that the extra credit will give students an incentive to make the event a priority,  as it is our institution’s way of acknowledging how the conversation should not merely happen in class but throughout our campus.”Vincent Banks and Jessamyn Fitzpatrick of Catharsis Productions — the Chicago-based performance group running Sex Signals, launched into a discussion about sexual relationships in a campus setting —“How many of you had sex ed classes in high school?” Banks asked the audience.A majority of students raised their hands.“What did you learn in those classes?” he asked.Students shouted out their answers.“Did anyone learn how to have sex. — other than from porn” Banks said half-jokingly in response.Throughout their hour and 15 minute performance, Banks and Fitzpatrick interacted with their audience as they acted out three hypothetical scenarios representative of real-life situations — flirting at a party, sexual harassment at a gym and dealing with people who make excuses for sexual assault in the name of friendship. The acts were used as teaching tools to break stereotypes, explain gender spectrums, clearly define consent, fight against victim-blaming and encourage bystander intervention.Towards the end of the program, the performers called for students to “raise the bar” on campus by making a culture of consent so normal that it would force those who do not ask for it to stand out.First year Danielle Slevin attended the performance with her friend and — fellow first year — Helton Rodriguez.“I felt that it was really empowering and really moving, especially to be in a room full of kids who might have experiences similar to mine or who feel the way I do. … I have friends who have been affected, whether it’s being uncomfortable at parties, or things that have escalated to more serious situations that were usually induced by alcohol,” Slevin said. “It’s a serious thing that is present on this campus, and it’s something that should be spoken about.”Rodriguez, who participated during the show, said he reflected on how the issues presented in the show were present in his life.“Whenever I have girls over at my dorm to study, I always have to ask if they’re comfortable walking home alone,” he said. “And it’s just kind of a sucky part of life.”He feels that Notre Dame’s strong Catholic identity can reinforce values preventing sexual assault, but also can make the topic a taboo to talk about.“I think, regardless, it’s problem on campus,” he said. “You can argue whether or not it’s harder or easier to talk about, but you have to talk about it.”Editor‘s note: A previous version of this article used the incorrect gender pronouns when referring to a student on first mention. The Observer regrets this error.Tags: Gender Relations Center, Moreau First Year Experience, Sex Signals, sexual assault Washington Hall rang with laughter Monday evening from first-year Moreau First Year Experience students who had gathered to watch and participate in Sex Signals, an annual improvisational comedy show sponsored by the Gender Relations Center (GRC) that aims to educate and inspire student discussion about sex, relationships and consent.The show was introduced to Notre Dame five years ago, but it is the first year the GRC is partnering with the Moreau program to allow students to receive ten extra credit points for their attendance, GRC director Christine Gebhardt said in an email.last_img read more

Canyon aero road price drops with new 2019 Aeroad CF SL frame option

first_imgAs much as Canyon continues to develop all-new bikes like the XC Lux we saw earlier this year, the direct-to-consumer bike maker also keeps dropping more affordable, alternative material versions of their most popular premium bikes. The latest to get this treatment is the Aeroad now with a second lower spec CF SL carbon frameset under the top-level CF SLX models.The Aeroad CF SL isn’t an isolated, affordable update. In the last year we saw Canyon drop an alloy version of their Inflite cyclocross bike, plus a more affordable CF SL carbon version there too, even an alloy version of the World Cup DH Sender. As recently as last week we also got a sneak peek as the upcoming aluminum version of their Grail gravel bike.2019 Canyon Aeroad CF SL trickle down carbon aero bikesTrickling down more affordable versions of existing carbon bikes can be a relatively logical step for a big company like Canyon. Working with the same external frame molds, Canyon just has to re-engineer a carbon layup using less costly materials. That’s not exceptionally easy, as they still have to end up with mostly the same stiffness in the revised construction, the only real penalty being typically 100-200g extra due to the lesser grade carbon.Looking at the new CF SL version of the Aeroad vs. the previous CF SLX version, you’d be hard pressed to identify and difference besides the extra X on the toptube. That’s because from the outside the framesets are effectively identical, which means you’ll get all the aero performance of the original in the new, more affordable CF SL versions.2019 Canyon Aeroad CF SL Disc affordable carbon aero road bikesThe new CF SL frame is available in a disc brake option if that’s what you’re after. For 2000€ you can pick up an electronic drivetrain ready frameset including frame, fork, headset, seatpost & aero cockpit (mechanical shift frames are only available as complete bikes.)Starting at 3200€ you’ll find the Aeroad CF SL Disc 7.0 complete bike with a 105 groupset and Reynolds carbon wheels. Or up to $5000 / 4700€ you’ll find the Aeroad CF SL Disc 8.0 Di2 complete build with an electronic Ultegra Di2 drivetrain and DT Swiss ARC 1400 tubeless carbon wheels, even in a WMN women-specific build at that top-level too.2019 Canyon Aeroad CF SL affordable carbon aero road bikesRim brakes are still an option for the Aeroad CF SL too. 2000€ will again get you a rim brake CF SL frameset with either mechanical or electronic shift routing, and here including frame, fork, headset, seatpost, aero cockpit, and a pair of Shimano Ultegra direct-mount rim brake calipers already installed.Complete bikes are also available from the $3000 / 2700€ Aeroad CF SL 7.0 (or WMN) with 105, up to the 4200€ Aeroad CF SL 8.0 Di2 again with electronic Ultegra.Canyon Aeroad CF SL availability vs. the Aeroad CF SLXThe question then remains, what benefit is there to buying the CF SLX versions, other than a hundred grams here or there? One reason may just be availability. In the US so far, it looks like only two CF SL complete bikes are available each in rim or disc brakes, and no frameset options.Then, if you pay close attention globally there are actually some SLX versions that look to offer the lighter, stiffer frame for less money. For the most part that appears to be due to discounts on 2018 spec’ed bikes with different wheelsets. But it would pay to look closely at the build specs before you pull the trigger on a new carbon Aeroad.Canyon.comlast_img read more

Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

first_imgSM East band fundraiser Saturday. The SM East band is planning to travel to Orlando, Fla., next spring and is holding fundraisers to defray the cost of the trip, which will include several performances. On Saturday, Nov. 21, the band will accept gently-used clothing and household items from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the SM East front parking lot and at the Savers Store at 5441 W. 95th Street. A followup drive will be held at the Savers Store on Dec. 5. The band will have another fundraiser on Dec. 10 from 4 to 8 p.m. at The Village Shops where ensembles will be playing and merchants will have specials that include donations to the band. The cost of the trip is $1,700 per student and 75 band members will be going.Mission accepting donations today. A clothing drive for the Uplift Organization, which works with the homeless in the metro, will be held today from 7 a.m. to noon in the parking lot by Sylvester Powell Jr. Community Center. Besides Items needed include candles, blankets, books, matches, sweaters, shirts, hats and other clothing.Battle of the Brains honor goes to Lee’s Summit school. NEJC’s Highland Elementary’s bid for $50,000 in prize money in Burns & McDonnell’s Battle of the Brains competition came up short, as Lee’s Summit’s Mason Elementary took the title this year. Northeast Johnson County morning roundup is brought to you by Twisted Sisters Coffee Shop on Johnson Drive. For updates on the latest blends and specialty drinks available, follow them on Facebook.last_img read more

Steady play from Lancers combined with penalty strokes for BV North earn SM East another golf title

first_imgThe Lancers celebrated with their 6A title at Ironhorse Monday. Photo credit SM East golf.SM East’s boys golfers got to celebrate another 6A state title with a single stroke team win over rival Blue Valley North — but it wasn’t just their play on the course that earned the victory.Register to continuelast_img

Florida lawyers attended College of Workers’ Comp

first_img QUITE A NUMBER OF FLORIDA lawyers attended the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers recent meeting in Boston. The College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers honors those attorneys who have distinguished themselves in their practice in the field of workers’ compensation. Members have been nominated for the outstanding traits they have developed in their practice of 20 years or longer representing plaintiffs, defendants, serving as judges, or acting for the benefit of all in education, overseeing agencies, and developing legislation. Pictured are old and new fellows of the organization from Florida, including, from the left, Judge John J. Lazzara, Rayford Taylor, James McConnaughhay, Glen Wieland, Steven Rissman, Richard Thompson, Stephen Barbas, Jake Schickel, David Parrish, Mary Ann Stiles, Robert Dietz, and Herbert Langston. For more information about the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, visit www.collegeofworkerscompensationlawyers.org. June 1, 2011 Regular News Florida lawyers attended College of Workers’ Complast_img read more

Toledo loses in final after strong tournament

first_imgToledo loses in final after strong tournamentLeandro Toledo was the only Gophers player to make it past the round of 16.Ichigo TakikawaMinnesota sophomore Leandro Toledo plays an opponent from Drake University at the ITA Central Regional Championship on Sunday. Toledo won the match and made the final, which he lost Monday. Dane MizutaniOctober 23, 2012Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintTwo weeks ago in Oklahoma, sophomore Leandro Toledo lost in the first round of a tournament and said he knew he could’ve played better.This week at the ITA Central Regional Championships at the Baseline Tennis Center, he proved it.Toledo rolled through his first three matches in the tournament and followed up with two more wins to reach the finals.He credited his serve as the biggest difference-maker in his run through the tournament.“It was a really big weapon,” Toledo said. “My aggressive play helped a lot as well.”In the finals, however, he lost to Guillermo Alcorta of Oklahoma 6-4, 6-1. Toledo said he thought he performed well enough to win but then missed some crucial shots in the match.“There was some hesitation in my game in the finals, and that is the reason I missed shots,” he said.Head coach Geoff Young said he was content with how Toledo handled himself throughout the tournament. He said his stud sophomore started his final match well but didn’t trust himself to hit his finishing shots.“That’s just a really high level of tennis,” Young said. “But I think he made some good decisions out there.”Besides Toledo, the rest of the team found success in the earlier rounds of the tournament, although no player made it past the third round. Minnesota advanced all six of its qualifying competitors through the first-round matches and won three matches in the second.Young said Mathieu Froment impressed him this weekend with his three-set win over fifth-seed Dane Webb in the second round.Rok Bonin won his second-round match as well, but both he and Froment fell in the ensuing round.The Gophers also won some doubles matches in the tournament, as the team of Toledo and Bonin played its way into the semifinals.There, they lost 8-0 to Alcorta and Axel Alverez from Oklahoma.Toledo said he and Bonin had a lot of chemistry on the court, but the semifinal loss proves there is room to grow.Young said none of his doubles groupings have stood out to him yet.“We have some good doubles players on our roster,” he said. “It’s just a matter of them gaining some confidence.”While the Gophers have seen a steady contribution from a bulk of players in the fall, Young said he hasn’t thought of the lineups he will use this spring for the Big Ten season.“That’s the last thing on my mind right now,” he said. “That usually just works itself out.”last_img read more

Magna Announces Management Change

first_imgAURORA, Ontario — Magna International has announced that Siegfried Wolf, Magna’s co-CEO, has resigned as a director and officer effective Nov. 15, in order to pursue an opportunity with Basic Element and its machinery division OJSC Russian Machines, the parent company of Russian automotive OEM, GAZ Group. Magna’s board has accepted Wolf’s resignation and has confirmed that Donald Walker will be Magna’s sole CEO.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Frank Stronach, Magna’s chairman, stated, “On behalf of the board, management and Magna’s employees, I would like to express our appreciation for Sigi’s major contribution to Magna’s success over the years, including in establishing our strong presence in Europe. When Oleg Deripaska recently approached us for permission for Basic Element to make an offer to Sigi, we made it clear that the decision should ultimately rest with Sigi. Magna’s decentralized culture and operating principles ensure that our success is not dependent on any one person. We respect the choice Sigi has made and wish him success in pursuing this new challenge.” Stronach added, “We also recognize the potential benefits that could arise from this opportunity — Magna stands to further strengthen its relationship with Basic Element and continue to grow in the recovering Russian automotive market, while Basic Element gains an experienced manager with extensive full vehicle assembly expertise who can immediately assist its automotive division in pursuing its modernization and growth strategy.” “Sigi has done a great job for Magna, particularly in building a strong European management team and strengthening our relationships with our European-based customers,” added Walker. “Notwithstanding this change, our executive management team, together with the global management teams at our operating groups and the decentralized management of our operating divisions remain committed to continuing to deliver strong operating and financial results with a continued focus on innovation and expanding our geographic footprint.”Advertisement In commenting on his departure and new appointment, Wolf stated, “I have the utmost respect for Magna and the culture and principles that Frank Stronach has instilled. While I look forward to this new challenge with Basic Element, I intend to remain a friend and strong supporter of Magna and have no doubt that it will continue to succeed under the guidance of Don and the rest of the executive management team. I also look forward to potential future opportunities to work together with Magna in connection with Magna’s ongoing expansion strategy in Russia and the important role that I am sure it will play in the development of the Russian automotive industry.”last_img read more

State Auditor Colón Warns Vulnerable New Mexicans About Unemployment Insurance Scams

first_imgSTATE News:ALBUQUERQUE — New Mexico State Auditor Brian Colón, through the Office of the State Auditor (OSA) and the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (NMDWS), urge New Mexicans to be aware of fraudsters seeking to exploit COVID-19 by taking advantage of vulnerable New Mexicans, particularly non-English speakers in the Refugee and Vietnamese communities, but can also impact Hispanic, and Native American communities.“Scammers are praying on New Mexico’s most vulnerable communities,” Auditor Colón said. “These predators are targeting non-English communities, taking their money and stealing their personal information. It cannot be stressed enough – do not provide your personal information and do not pay services fees to untrusted sources.”“Many of the individuals we’re helping are filing for unemployment insurance for the very first time,” said New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions Secretary Bill McCamley. “Please be cautious of scammers trying to take advantage of the situation.” No fee: There is no fee to file for unemployment compensation. NMDWS will never ask for a debit card or other method of payment in order to process a claim. If you get a phone call from someone identifying themselves as a representative of NMDWS, do not give any information to the caller or send money.False websites: Some websites may advertise they can assist claimants in filing for unemployment benefits. These sites may offer services free of charge and others do charge for services. The sites often ask for confidential/private information such as your Social Security number, address, work history, and email address. Use only the official NMDWS website at www.jobs.state.nm.us. Online surveys: NMDWS does not pay claimants to take surveys. If you receive an email requesting you complete on online survey that appears to be from the State, do not complete the survey. This is likely an attempt to get your personal information. MDWS is actively working on methods to increase accessibility of information to non-English speaking communities throughout New Mexico and has provided a list of community partners throughout the state who are assisting the Department provide necessary translation services.The OSA and the NMDWS urges non-English speaking New Mexicans to seek support from the following trusted community organizations: Lutheran Family Serviceshttps://www.lfsrm.org/(505).933.7032 APS Refugee Programhttps://www.aps.edu/office-of-equity-and-engagement/refugee-and-newcomer-supports(505).803.7781 The Asian Family Centerhttps://nmafc.org/(505).717.2877center_img Additional information for employers and workers affected by COVID-19, including frequently asked questions, can be found at www.dws.state.nm.us/COVID-19-Info.New Mexicans concerned about COVID-19 related fraud or other scamming activity is urged to immediately file a complaint with the Office of the Attorney General at nmag.gov.New Mexicans concerned about potential instances of fraud, waste, and abuse should contact the Office of the State auditor. Reports may be made anonymously through our website at www.saonm.org or by calling 1.866.OSA.FRAUD. You may also speak to an investigator by calling 505.476.3800.last_img read more