Apoel face must-win clash against Qarabag

first_imgApoel meet Qarabag FK in Nicosia in round four of the group stages of the Europa League where only a win will keep alive their chances of progressing to the knockout stages of the tournament.This will be the fourth time the two sides will meet this season as they also squared off in the Champions League qualifiers in August, with Apoel going through after defeating Qarabag by a bigger score in Azerbaijan, having lost the first leg in Nicosia.However, Apoel’s German coach Tomas Doll knows that his side must improve considerably if they are to win Thursday night’s game, especially as the Azeris outplayed and outclassed the Cyprus champions in all three of this season’s previous meetings.The reverse fixture in Azerbaijan two weeks ago finished 2-2, but Qarabag had 70 per cent of the possession with Apoel needing almost 30 minutes to launch their first attack and it took them another 25 minutes to enter the final third of the field in the second half.Nobody can predict how Doll will line-up his team as he ‘likes’ to surprise everyone with his selections. With the possible exception of Roman Bezjak, Doll has all other players at his disposal.Tomas de Vincenti has overcome a niggling injury and may be included in the starting line-up to add some flair and imagination in the centre of the park, something that Apoel have sorely missed in recent games.Portuguese winger Andre Vidigal seems to have won over his coach but he is not eligible to play as he was not included in Apoel’s Europa League squad.A lot will also depend on whether Doll will start with two up front, Pavlovic and Hallenius. He tried this ploy in Azerbaijan and it proved ineffective.Qarabaq know that even a draw will probably be enough to see them finish in second place in the group, but their strength lies in attack where tricky wingers Zoubir and Quintana can cause the Apoel defence a lot of problems if they are given even the slightest space.The game will be officiated by Austrian referee Manuel Schuttengruber and will kick-off at 7.55pm.In the other group A game, Sevilla travel to Luxembourg to face F91 Dudelange with the Spanish outfit expected to record their fourth straight group win and guarantee themselves top spot.last_img read more

Watch: Matt Taylor scores incredible free-kick for Swindon Town

first_img1 Watch Matt Taylor’s goal below Swindon may have been defeated by Wycombe Wanderers on Tuesday night, but it wasn’t all sorrow for one Robins star.Matt Taylor scored the fourth goal of the game at Adams Park to make the score 2-2 just after the hour mark.Adebayo Akinfenwa netted a winner for the hosts in the last minute, but Taylor’s was the most memorable goal of the night.That is because it was a stupendous free-kick that thundered into the far top corner of the net.You can watch a video of the goal below…center_img Stuff #ValentinesDay, we’re just gonna watch this @Official_MattT free-kick over, and over again. One to remember for @Official_STFC fans. 😍 pic.twitter.com/eiHmB2c7RY— EFL (@EFL) February 14, 2018last_img read more

Klopp gives injury update on Liverpool teen after ‘full-throttle’ Sevilla tackle

first_imgSpeaking after his side’s 2-1 defeat in Boston, the Liverpool boss said: “[It’s] much too early in the season to create headlines with saying the things I think about the situation.“Let me say how the situation is with Yasser; it looks like he was lucky but, of course, how it always is with these things we have to wait a little bit. He couldn’t keep on playing, so that’s the first not-so-good sign but in the dressing room it was OK, similar how it looks to Harry [Wilson].“Harry got a knock on his jaw and a finger in his eye, so not too cool. He should be OK as well but couldn’t carry on as well. That’s the situation.” LIVING THE DREAM Chelsea confident of beating Man United and Liverpool to Sancho signing Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti Ever Banega was lucky to stay on the pitch after catching Harry Wilson in the face with an elbow, but the most significant moment came when French defender Gnagnon was dealt a straight red card for needlessly scything down Reds youngster Larouci.The reckless tackle draw a strong response from senior Liverpool players, with captain Jordan Henderson and defender Virgil van Dijk and Andy Robertson angrily confronting the Sevilla man at full-time.Larouci left the pitch on a stretcher and was later seen walking with crutches and with a protective boot on his leg.His club said the young left-back will require further assessment, but Klopp said believes he not as seriously injured as first thought. Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Asked for specifics on the Larouci injury, Klopp added: “He hit him full throttle and, in that moment, [if it was] a little bit different position where he hit him then it’s done. He rolls… he is a sports boy so that was OK, nothing happened there.“I don’t know 100 per cent. It looks like he was lucky but I only spoke quickly to the Doc and that’s what he said, but we have to see.” moving on getty Kevin De Bruyne ‘loves Man City and wants to keep winning’, reveals father targets TOP WORK Getty Images REVEALED Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January targets Cavani ‘agrees’ to join new club and will complete free transfer next summer Larouci is taken off the pitch on a stretcher at Fenway Park three-way race The biggest market value losers in 2019, including Bale and ex-Liverpool star LATEST TRANSFER NEWS AND GOSSIP 2 Liverpool’s signings under Michael Edwards – will Minamino be the next big hit? Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp is thankful 18-year-old Yasser Larouci was not more seriously injured after he was ‘hit full throttle’ by a disgusting challenge from Sevilla’s Joris Gnagnon.Sunday’s pre-season friendly at Fenway Park was marred by a number of ill-tempered incidents, which saw Sevilla widely slammed by supporters on social media for their conduct. Liverpool’s Yasser Larouci lies on the pitch after being fouled during a pre-season friendly match against Sevilla 2 LATEST last_img read more

John McGinn completes move from Hibernian to Aston Villa

first_imgThat interest materialised with an offer from Villa that was accepted by Hibernian. Celtic then matched the bid but the Scotland international will play in the Championship for Steve Bruce’s side this season, disappointing Brendan Rodgers who had identified him as a signing target.McGinn told Aston Villa’s website: “I’m really pleased to have joined the club. I’ve already visited Villa Park and the training ground and the set-up is incredible.“The last 24 hours have been a bit of a whirlwind with so much going on but I can’t wait to take part in my first training session and make my debut.”St Mirren will also benefit from the deal. The Paisley club are entitled to one-third of the fee as part of the deal that took McGinn to Easter Road in 2015. Aston Villa have completed the signing of John McGinn from Hibernian.The midfielder has penned a four-year deal at Villa Park after travelling to Birmingham to undergo a medical and discuss personal terms.McGinn was in the final year of his contract at Easter Road but Hibs had insisted that he would not leave this summer unless the club’s valuation was met.Initial bids from Celtic were rejected but Hibs head coach Neil Lennon had said that he expected interest from England as the transfer deadline for clubs south of the border draws near.last_img read more

Business booming for India and South Africa

first_imgThe Kiepersol colliery is one of the manysuccessful South Africa-India businessventures.(Image: Jindal Africa) The vast scale of the Richards Bay coalterminal is still not big enough to holdthe coal supplies needed by India.(Image: Richards Bay Coal Terminal) Trade and Industry minister Rob Davies,left, Indian president Pratibha Patil, andSouth African president Jacob Zuma, right,address the India-South Africa BusinessForum.(Image: The Presidency)MEDIA CONTACTS • Sidwell MedupeChief director, media and communicationsDepartment of Trade and Industry+27 12 394 1650 or +27 79 492 1774Janine ErasmusSouth Africa and India have much to offer each other – this is the view of industry professionals and government representatives, who came together at the India-South Africa Business Forum, held in Pretoria as part of the visit to South Africa in May by Indian President Pratibha Patil.President Jacob Zuma addressed the media after his first meeting with Patil, saying that South Africa has “once again extended an invitation to Indian business to invest in our infrastructure development programme, in which we are to invest more than R800-billion (US$103-billion) until 2014”.Of this amount, R300-billion ($39-billion) will go towards energy and R260-billion ($34-billion) towards transport.At a workshop held during the forum to discuss possibilities in mining and energy, Mbuso Dlamini, executive chairman of infrastructure development company Palace Group, said that with the country’s shift towards green energy, opportunities have opened up.South Africa currently has an energy generation capacity of about 43GW, he said, of which more than 80% comes from coal. Under the Integrated Energy Plan, which will balance the country’s needs with its greenhouse gas emissions, that capacity will expand to 80GW by 2020, with 14GW drawn from renewable sources.“This is a big task,” said Dlamini, “and we’ll need partners to help us. India’s production is a massive 180GW, and more is planned, so that country has the experience and expertise we need.”He mentioned that South Africa will be focusing on solar, wind and biogas energy sources, but will have to rely mainly on its coal resources for the foreseeable future. The country has a low potential for hydroelectric power generation.“We will have to refurbish existing infrastructure, which will create yet more opportunities,” said Dlamini. “The president has indicated that billions are to be pumped into infrastructure, and that includes substations and similar structures.”He said that independent power producers will also have an important role to play, especially once the Independent Systems and Market Operator (ISMO) comes into operation.This proposed state-owned entity will buy electricity from generators and sell it to customers on a wholesale level, independently of national power utility Eskom. The body will also operate the integrated power transmission system.The establishment of the ISMO will help to relieve some of the financial and logistical pressure on Eskom, and will open up the energy generation market to independent producers.One of the envisaged ISMO’s key functions will be to maintain a balance between supply and demand of electricity, and it will also be involved in concluding electricity import and export agreements.The ISMO Bill, which provides for the establishment of the body, was tabled in Parliament in March 2012.Dlamini said that although the Western Cape currently relies heavily on the Koeberg nuclear power station, plans are in place to install infrastructure that will allow the region to receive power from the rest of the country, should the Koeberg facility go offline.“We want to take the power to every user,” said Dlamini, “all the way from the Waterberg (in Limpopo, and site of much of South Africa’s coal reserves) down to Cape Town. We need to connect people to the national grid, and we all know that if more people pay for electricity, the price will come down.”For this, he estimated, a spend of R300- to R500-billion ($39- to $64-billion) is needed.Distribution is managed by municipalities but, said Dlamini, despite a number of starts and stops the arrival of regional electricity distributors, or Reds, is not far off. Six Reds are in the planning, and they will combine Eskom’s distribution function with that of South Africa’s 187 municipalities. Certain functions, such as the ability to disconnect non-paying customers, will remain with the municipalities.This move is expected to address and resolve issues such as the highly fragmented structure of the industry, the wide disparities in electricity tariffs, and the uneven spread of electrification across the country.Opportunities for coal exportJitin Bhatia, the director of business development at INSA Coal Holdings, described his company’s operations in South Africa.INSA, a South Africa-India partnership, was formed out of an equal partnership with India’s Action Group – one of the country’s most diversified business conglomerates – and the South African Sephaku Holdings. The latter company was subsequently unbundled with its subsidiary Incubex Minerals taking over as the other 50% shareholder of INSA.The company was set up with a view to identifying, obtaining and developing coal projects in South Africa. Its active prospecting operations, based mainly in Mpumalanga province, started in February 2010.Although it considered other options including Indonesia and Australia, the Action Group chose South Africa as its business destination, said Bhatia, for a number of reasons.“The financial institutions here are very strong,” he said, “and several of them have operations elsewhere on the African continent, which opens up other opportunities. The stock exchange in Johannesburg is also outstanding.”He named political stability; a strong human resource pool, especially in technical and production capabilities; the country’s strong mining reputation and expertise; its relatively low population density; and its wealth of mineral resources as other contributing factors.“We now have 22 coal blocks,” he said, “and these are not connected to Eskom in any way, so we’re not taking their coal.” A coal block is an area for which a company has received a mining license to extract the resource.Bhatia said that the ease with which the Action Group was able to set up shop in South Africa has led to requests for partnerships from Indian public sector companies.“There are immense opportunities for exporting,” he said. “In 2011 South Africa’s coal exports out of the Richards Bay coal terminal were 65-million tons, and India’s shortfall for coal was 140-million tons. So we can take all your exports, and more, of any grade.”Bhatia stressed that there were also opportunities for South African companies in India, especially in highly specialised operations such as shaft sinking.Great opportunitiesChemical engineer Tony Zebert, a South African working for Jindal Africa, said his wife thought he was crazy when he resigned from his secure job at fuel producer Sasol to join the local branch of one of India’s biggest companies.But, said Zebert, the Jindal Africa country head in South Africa, he was convinced that there were great opportunities ahead, and he hasn’t been disappointed.“My goal is to help make the two economies into one of the world’s powerful groupings,” he said, “as I believe they can be.”Jindal Africa is a part of Indian multinational giant Jindal Steel and Power Limited, a leading force globally in the steel, power, mining, coal to liquid, oil and gas, and infrastructure sectors.Jindal owns the Kiepersol thermal coal mine in Mpumalanga, from which it obtains metallurgical grade anthracite coal. The deal, concluded in 2009, marked the first completed purchase of a coal mine in South Africa by an Indian entity.Since then, Jindal has announced that it plans to invest $300-million ($39-million) to develop new and existing mines in Africa.“We’re here to stay,” said Zebert, “and we’re even building our own office block on William Nicol Drive.” This road runs through the business district of Sandton, north of Johannesburg, and is popular as a location for corporate headquarters because of its accessibility to Sandton and nearby freeways.Jindal mines the coal and sends it to India for further processing.“There are more opportunities like this,” said Zebert. “In Mpumalanga there are huge dumps of discarded, low grade coal. We just need a way to get it out of there, because India will use it.”Steel and power are the foundations of any economy, said Zebert, and Jindal is planning to play a role in both those industries.“We aim to build our first power plant in Botswana, and I would dearly like to build a steel mill in South Africa.”He added that the company is looking at mining coal in Mozambique.“This has the potential to supersede South Africa in coal exports,” he said, “and in Mozambique there are fewer restrictions – we can build and own our own railway. We’re also interested in limestone in Madagascar, and copper in Zambia.”last_img read more

Enterprise 2.0 To Become a $4.6 Billion Industry By 2013

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A new report released today by Forrester Research is predicting that enterprise spending on Web 2.0 technologies is going to increase dramatically over the next five years. This increase will include more spending on social networking tools, mashups, and RSS, with the end result being a global enterprise market of $4.6 billion by the year 2013.This change is not without its challenges. Although there is money to be made in the industry by vendors, Web 2.0 tools by their very nature are defined by commoditization; as is much of the new social media industry, a topic we touched on briefly here, when discussing how content has become a commodity. For vendors specifically, there are 3 main challenges to becoming successful in this new industry, including:I.T. shops being wary of what they perceive as “consumer-grade” technologyAd-supported web tools generally have “free” as the starting pointWeb 2.0 tools will have to now compete in a space currently dominated by legacy enterprise software investmentsWhat is Enterprise Web 2.0?Most technologists segment the Web 2.0 market between “consumer” Web 2.0 technologies and “business” Web 2.0 technologies. So what does Enterprise 2.0 include then?Well, what it doesn’t include is consumer services like Blogger, Facebook, Netvibes, and Twitter, says Forrester. These types of services are aimed at consumers and are often supported by ads, so they do not qualify as Enterprise 2.0 tools. Instead, collaboration and productivity tools based on the concepts of web 2.0, but designed for the enterprise worker will count as being Enterprise 2.0. In addition, for-pay services, like those from BEA Systems, IBM, Microsoft, Awareness, NewsGator Technologies, and Six Apart will factor in. Enterprise marketing tools have also expanded to include Web 2.0 technologies. For example, money spent on the creation and syndication of a Facebook app or a web site/social network widget could be considered Enterprise 2.0. However, pure ad spending dollars, including those spent on consumer Web 2.0 sites, will not count as Enterprise 2.0.Getting Past the I.T. Gatekeeper One of the main challenges of getting Web 2.0 into the enterprise will be getting past the gatekeepers of traditional I.T. Businesses have been showing interest in these new technologies, but, ironically, the interest comes from departments outside of I.T. Instead, it’s the marketing department, R&D, and corporate communications pushing for the adoption of more Web 2.0-like tools.Unfortunately, as often is the case, the business owners themselves don’t have the knowledge or expertise to make technology purchasing decisions for their company. They rely on I.T. to do so – a department that currently spends 70% of their budget maintaining past investments. Despite the absolute mission-critical nature of I.T. in today’s business, the department is often provided with slim budgets, which tends to only allow for maintaining current infrastructure, not experimenting with new, unproven technologies.To make matters worse, I.T. tends to view Web 2.0 tools as being insecure at best, or, at worst, a security threat to the business. They also don’t trust what they perceive to be “consumer-grade” technologies, which they don’t believe have the power to scale to the size that an enterprise demands.In addition, I.T. departments currently work with a host of legacy applications. The new tools, in order to compete with these, will have to be able to integrate with existing technology, at least for the time being, in order to be fully effective. Finally, given the tight budgets, there is still a chance that even if a particular tool does meet all the requirements to get in the door at a particular company, I.T. or other company personnel utilizing the service may try to exploit the free version of the service if the price point for the “enterprise” version gets to be too high. They may also choose to look for a free, open source alternative.Enterprise 2.0 AdoptionHow Web 2.0 Will Reach $4.6 BillionAll that being said, the Web 2.0 market, as  small as it is now, is, in fact, growing. In 2008, firms with 1000 employees or more will spend $764 million on Web 2.0 tools and technologies. Over the next five years, that expenditure will grow at a compound annual rate of 43%.The top spending category will be social networking tools. In 2008, for example, companies will spend $258 million on tools like those from Awareness, Communispace, and Jive Software. After social networking, the next-largest category is RSS, followed by blogs and wikis, and then mashups.The vendors expected to do the best in this new marketplace will be those that bundle their offerings, offering the complete package of tools to the businesses they serve.However, newer, “pure” Web 2.0 companies hoping to capitalize on this trend will still have to fight with traditional I.T. software for a foothold, specifically fighting with the likes of Microsoft and IBM. Many I.T. shops will choose to stick with their existing software from these large, well-known vendors, especially now that both are integrating Web 2.0 into their offerings. Microsoft’s SharePoint, for example, now includes wikis, blogs, and RSS technologies in their collaboration suite. IBM offers social networking and mashup tools via their Lotus Connections and Lotus Mashups products and SAP Business Suite includes social networking and widgets.What this means is that much of the Web 2.0 tool kit will simply “fade into the fabric of enterprise collaboration suites,” says Forrester. By 2013, few buyers will seek out and purchase Web 2.0 tools specifically. Web 2.0 will become a feature, not a product.Enterprise 2.0 SpendingOther TrendsOther trends will also have an impact on this new marketplace, including the following:External Spending Will Beat Internal Spending: External Web 2.0 expenditure will surpass internal expenditure in 2009, and, by 2013, will dwarf internal spending by a billion dollars. Internally, companies will spend money on internal social networking, blogs, wikis, and RSS; externally, the spending patterns will be very similar. Social networking tools that provide customer interaction, allowing customers the ability to create profiles, join discussion boards, and read company blogs, for example, will receive more investment and development over the next five years.Europe & Asia Pacific Markets Grow: Europe and Asia Pacific will become more substantial markets in 2009. Fewer European companies have embraced Web 2.0 tools, leaving much room for growth. Asia Pacific will also grow in 2009.Web 2.0 Graduates from “Kids’ Stuff”:  Right now, it’s people between the ages of 12 and 17 that are the more avid consumers of social computing technology, with one-third of them acting as content creators. Meanwhile, only 7% of those 51-61 do the same. However, this is another trend that is going to change over the next few years. By 2011, Forrester believes that users of Web 2.0 tools will mirror users of the web at large.Retirement of Baby Boomers: As with many things, it takes the passing of the older generation from executive status into retirement before a true shift can occur. Over the next three years, millions of baby boomers will retire and the younger workers brought in to fill the void will not only want, but will expect similar tools in the office as those they use at home in their personal lives.What It All MeansFor vendors wanting to play in the Enterprise 2.0 space, there are a few key takeaways to be learned from this research. For one, they can help ensure their success in this niche by selling across deployment types. That is, plan to grow beyond just selling to either the internal or external market. Another option is to segment the enterprise marketplace by industry and then by company size. Some industries are more customer-focused than others when it comes to the external market, so developing customized solutions for a particular industry could be a key to success. For internal tools, focusing efforts on deploying enterprise grade tools that include things like integration or security will help sell products to larger customers. Other  levels of service can be designed specifically for the SMBs, featuring simple, self-provisioning products to help cut down on costs.Finally, vendors looking to grow should consider making a name for themselves in the Europe or Asia Pacific markets, where the opportunity comes from the expected increased investment rates for Web 2.0/Enterprise 2.0 in those geographic regions.However, the most valuable aspect of this change for vendors is the knowledge they obtain about how to run a successful SaaS business – something that will help propel them into the next decade and beyond and, ultimately, will provide more value than any single Web 2.0 offering alone ever will.center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#enterprise#Features#Trends#web sarah perezlast_img read more

Top 50 Funniest Tweets from SomeEcards

first_imgWe wrote earlier this week about the most quoted tweets of the year, but how about the most humorous? Luckily, we have the service SomeEcards.com, which always seems to capture the zeitgeist of the moment, and they have announced the top 50 funniest tweets of the year. Tags:#art#web Related Posts And there were plenty of entries in the top 50 about the various changes that Facebook made over the past year, including this gem: 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Thanks for all the laughs this year! center_img And some are just plain clever and could become the next SomeEcard text, such as this one: 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… You gotta love a site that labels its tabs for trending topics to include Jesus, Sex, and just “inappropriate.” Guess which one I am clicking on first? Nonetheless, over the years the greeting card site has become my go-to place for certain friends and relatives that can appreciate its quirky and some scatological humor, always incorporating current events to celebrate life’s little moments. Yes, several tweets refer to the Kardashian antics of the past year, such as this one. 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout david stromlast_img read more

Obama orders effort to build first exascale computer

first_imgThe United States is now committed to building an exascale computer, some 30 times more powerful than today’s top machine. Yesterday, President Barack Obama signed an executive order creating a national strategic computing initiative, which aims to coordinate high-performance computing research and development between federal agencies. The order should make it easier for agencies to justify increasing their budget requests to Congress for supercomputing R&D.“This is an extremely important step for high performance computing in the U.S.,” says Horst Simon, deputy director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. The absence of a coordinated federal supercomputing effort had made it more difficult for agencies like the Department of Energy (DOE) to make their case with the Office of Management and Budget that they needed to boost supercomputing budgets, Simon says. The new order “reverses that.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Jack Dongarra, a supercomputing expert at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, says the new U.S. plans come partially as a response to concern over China’s surge in high-performance computing. According to the latest TOP500 list released earlier this month, the United States continues to lead the world in supercomputing power, with 233 of the top 500 machines. But that lead has been dwindling and is near a historic low. China has 37 of the top 500 supercomputers, but it has had the most powerful machine since June 2013. The world’s top supercomputer, China’s Tianhe-2, is nearly twice as powerful as the second place machine, Titan at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. And China recently announced plans to upgrade the Tianhe-2 machine to about 100 petaflops (quadrillions of floating point operations per second). An exaflop is 1000 petaflops.Past U.S. supercomputing efforts have largely been pursued independently by different federal agencies, each looking to use advanced computing to help fulfill its mission, such as climate modeling and nuclear stockpile stewardship. But the top machines are now so complex and expensive that agencies must pool their R&D budgets. As a result, Simon says he and other U.S. supercomputing experts have been pushing the executive branch for years to come out with a plan for coordinating research across the federal government. The goal is break through obstacles that stand in the way of building much faster machines. (See this Science feature to learn more.)Recently, several agencies have announced plans to integrate their supercomputing efforts. In November, DOE and the National Nuclear Security Agency—the part of DOE that oversees nuclear weapons—outlined joint plans to build an exascale machine by 2024.  As a step along the way, DOE also announced last fall that it would spend $325 million to build two supercomputers between 100 and 300 petaflopsReaching exascale is expected to be far more difficult than simply wiring additional computer processors together (as Science reported in this 2012 feature). Tianhe-2 already uses 18 megawatts of power, enough to power 18,000 homes. Using that same technology to get to exascale would require on the order of 540 megawatts, about the output of a nuclear power plant.To get over such hurdles, Congress too appears poised to back an exascale push. Last week senators Lisa Murkowski (R–AK) and Maria Cantwell (D–WA) introduced comprehensive energy legislation that would direct the DOE to set up two parallel research efforts, each headed by a national laboratory in partnership with allied industry and academic groups. Because there are so many technical challenges to overcome in reaching exascale, the hope is that one of the two approaches would prove successful enough in the prototyping stage to warrant using it to build an actual exascale supercomputer. Computing experts largely back the twin track approach. The Senate energy committee today approved the legislation, but it still must be approved by the full Senate and House of Representatives. Thus far, however, Simon says that high performance computing enjoys broad bipartisan support in Congress.last_img read more

Superpods of 600 dolphins are gathering off the coast of South Africa

first_img Superpods of 600 dolphins are gathering off the coast of South Africa Thibaut Bouveroux Thibaut Bouveroux Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins surfing the waves off the Eastern Cape of South Africa. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins surfing the waves off the Eastern Cape of South Africa. Thibaut Bouveroux A single dolphin jumps from the water. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins average about 2.6 meters long and 230 kilograms. Thibaut Bouveroux Thibaut Bouveroux Bottlenose dolphins are known for hanging out in large pods, but finding more than 50 or 60 in a group is unusual. Now, researchers studying Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) off the coast of South Africa have found that populations there have skyrocketed, going from an average of just 18 dolphins per group in 2008 to 76 dolphins in 2016. And those are just the averages: Some superpods in Algoa Bay, a shallow inlet off the Eastern Cape, were as big as 600 members, they report this week in Marine Mammal Science. Dolphin pods were larger in the bay (average size 325), than they were offshore (average size 135). ‹› A single dolphin jumps from the water. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins average about 2.6 meters long and 230 kilograms. By Kimberly HickokJan. 26, 2018 , 12:05 PM Pods of bottlenose dolphins have been growing in size for the last decade. Here, a group of several hundred hangs out in the waves of Algoa Bay. The growth of the pods—and their location—is a mystery. Researchers expected larger groups to be found farther north in the Wild Coast region, where the water is deeper. But instead, the researchers say the dolphins may be gathering in the shallows in large groups for protection against sharks; many white sharks, which have been known to attack dolphins, live in the area.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more